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Reblogged from thepeoplesrecord
thepeoplesrecord:

Seven states to sue the EPA for Clean Air Act violationsDecember 12, 2012
Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, leading a coalition of seven states, today notified the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of his intent to sue the Agency for violating the Clean Air Act by failing to address methane emissions from the oil and natural gas industry. EPA has determined that methane is a powerful climate change pollutant emitted by the industry in large quantities. Because of this, and the availability of affordable methods for controlling the industry’s methane emissions, Attorney General Schneiderman’s coalition charges that EPA violated the Clean Air Act when it largely ignored methane in recent updates to air pollution emission standards for the industry.
Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas. Pound for pound, it warms the climate about 25 times more than carbon dioxide. EPA has found that the impacts of climate change caused by methane include “increased air and ocean temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, melting and thawing of global glaciers and ice, increasingly severe weather events—such as hurricanes of greater intensity—and sea level rise.” In 2009, EPA determined that methane and other greenhouse gases endanger the public’s health and welfare.
The EPA’s decision not to directly address the emissions of methane from oil and natural gas operations—including hydrofracking—leaves almost 95% of these emissions uncontrolled.
“We simply can’t continue to ignore the evidence of climate change or the catastrophic threat that unabated greenhouse gas pollution poses to our families, our communities and our economy,” Attorney General Schneiderman said. “While it is clear that methane from oil and natural gas development contributes substantially to climate change pollution, regulators have failed to require the industry to use available and cost-effective measures to control these emissions. Today, our coalition is putting EPA on notice that we are prepared to sue to force action on curbing climate change pollution from the oil and gas industry.”
The EPA has determined that oil and natural gas production wells, gathering lines, processing facilities, storage tanks and transmission and distribution pipelines emit more than 15 million metric tons of methane annually—the equivalent yearly climate change pollution of 64 million cars. As such, the industry is the single largest source of man-made methane emissions in the U.S., and the second largest industrial source of domestic greenhouse gas emissions behind only electric power plants.
The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set emission controls—known as “New Source Performance Standards” or “NSPS”—for industrial sectors that cause or significantly contribute to air pollution that endangers public health and welfare. In August 2012, EPA revised NSPS regulations for the oil and natural gas industry. These regulations included, for the first time, federal air emission standards for natural gas wells developed through hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” along with requirements for several other sources of pollution in the oil and gas industry that are currently not regulated at the federal level.
However, the revised regulations do not address the industry’s methane emissions. In fact, although EPA concluded that its regulations would have “co-benefits” in reducing methane emissions, its decision not to directly address the emissions of methane from oil and natural gas operations leaves almost 95 percent of these emissions uncontrolled.
In today’s notice of intent to sue, Attorney General Schneiderman’s coalition charges that the EPA violated the Clean Air Act when it failed to address methane emissions in the August 2012 regulations. Specifically, the coalition argues that because EPA recognizes that methane endangers public health and welfare and is emitted in large quantities by the oil and gas industry—and has 18 years of data demonstrating that many methods of controlling these emissions are available and cost-effective—the Agency broke the law by deferring a decision on whether to set NSPS standards for methane emissions from the industry. The coalition’s notice states that it intends to file suit against EPA in federal district court, unless the Agency makes timely decisions on setting standards to curb these methane emissions from the oil and gas industry.
The Clean Air Act requires parties to provide EPA a 60-day notice of intent to sue under provisions of the Act. Joining Attorney General Schneiderman in today’s notice are the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont.
From severe droughts and heat waves to a string of devastating storms in the northeast over the last two years, it is becoming ever more apparent that increasing greenhouse gas pollution contributes to climate disruption in the U.S. and around the globe. Since taking office, Attorney General Schneiderman has established himself as a leader, both in New York and nationally, in the fight against climate change. For example:
• Schneiderman is currently leading a coalition of states in pressing EPA to honor its legal commitment to regulate emissions of climate change pollution from their largest source: fossil fuel powered electric generating plants. The Agency is expected to issue final regulations limiting greenhouse gas emissions from new fossil fuel power plants early next year.
• Earlier this year, Attorney General Schneiderman successfully defended New York State’s participation in the “Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative” (RGGI) — a multi-state effort to reduce emissions of climate change pollution — against a lawsuit backed by the out-of-state organization Americans for Prosperity.
• Last month, Attorney General Schneiderman joined California and a number of environmental organizations by intervening in federal court to defend a national program to reduce greenhouse gas and improve fuel economy for passenger cars and light duty trucks. This follows on the heels of a successful defense of EPA’s first-ever greenhouse gas regulations. In a landmark decision handed down in June 2012 by a federal Appeals Court, Schneiderman argued on behalf of a coalition of states for the court to uphold these regulations.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Seven states to sue the EPA for Clean Air Act violations
December 12, 2012

Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, leading a coalition of seven states, today notified the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of his intent to sue the Agency for violating the Clean Air Act by failing to address methane emissions from the oil and natural gas industry. EPA has determined that methane is a powerful climate change pollutant emitted by the industry in large quantities. Because of this, and the availability of affordable methods for controlling the industry’s methane emissions, Attorney General Schneiderman’s coalition charges that EPA violated the Clean Air Act when it largely ignored methane in recent updates to air pollution emission standards for the industry.

Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas. Pound for pound, it warms the climate about 25 times more than carbon dioxide. EPA has found that the impacts of climate change caused by methane include “increased air and ocean temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, melting and thawing of global glaciers and ice, increasingly severe weather events—such as hurricanes of greater intensity—and sea level rise.” In 2009, EPA determined that methane and other greenhouse gases endanger the public’s health and welfare.

The EPA’s decision not to directly address the emissions of methane from oil and natural gas operations—including hydrofracking—leaves almost 95% of these emissions uncontrolled.

“We simply can’t continue to ignore the evidence of climate change or the catastrophic threat that unabated greenhouse gas pollution poses to our families, our communities and our economy,” Attorney General Schneiderman said. “While it is clear that methane from oil and natural gas development contributes substantially to climate change pollution, regulators have failed to require the industry to use available and cost-effective measures to control these emissions. Today, our coalition is putting EPA on notice that we are prepared to sue to force action on curbing climate change pollution from the oil and gas industry.”

The EPA has determined that oil and natural gas production wells, gathering lines, processing facilities, storage tanks and transmission and distribution pipelines emit more than 15 million metric tons of methane annually—the equivalent yearly climate change pollution of 64 million cars. As such, the industry is the single largest source of man-made methane emissions in the U.S., and the second largest industrial source of domestic greenhouse gas emissions behind only electric power plants.

The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set emission controls—known as “New Source Performance Standards” or “NSPS”—for industrial sectors that cause or significantly contribute to air pollution that endangers public health and welfare. In August 2012, EPA revised NSPS regulations for the oil and natural gas industry. These regulations included, for the first time, federal air emission standards for natural gas wells developed through hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” along with requirements for several other sources of pollution in the oil and gas industry that are currently not regulated at the federal level.

However, the revised regulations do not address the industry’s methane emissions. In fact, although EPA concluded that its regulations would have “co-benefits” in reducing methane emissions, its decision not to directly address the emissions of methane from oil and natural gas operations leaves almost 95 percent of these emissions uncontrolled.

In today’s notice of intent to sue, Attorney General Schneiderman’s coalition charges that the EPA violated the Clean Air Act when it failed to address methane emissions in the August 2012 regulations. Specifically, the coalition argues that because EPA recognizes that methane endangers public health and welfare and is emitted in large quantities by the oil and gas industry—and has 18 years of data demonstrating that many methods of controlling these emissions are available and cost-effective—the Agency broke the law by deferring a decision on whether to set NSPS standards for methane emissions from the industry. The coalition’s notice states that it intends to file suit against EPA in federal district court, unless the Agency makes timely decisions on setting standards to curb these methane emissions from the oil and gas industry.

The Clean Air Act requires parties to provide EPA a 60-day notice of intent to sue under provisions of the Act. Joining Attorney General Schneiderman in today’s notice are the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont.

From severe droughts and heat waves to a string of devastating storms in the northeast over the last two years, it is becoming ever more apparent that increasing greenhouse gas pollution contributes to climate disruption in the U.S. and around the globe. Since taking office, Attorney General Schneiderman has established himself as a leader, both in New York and nationally, in the fight against climate change. For example:

• Schneiderman is currently leading a coalition of states in pressing EPA to honor its legal commitment to regulate emissions of climate change pollution from their largest source: fossil fuel powered electric generating plants. The Agency is expected to issue final regulations limiting greenhouse gas emissions from new fossil fuel power plants early next year.

• Earlier this year, Attorney General Schneiderman successfully defended New York State’s participation in the “Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative” (RGGI) — a multi-state effort to reduce emissions of climate change pollution — against a lawsuit backed by the out-of-state organization Americans for Prosperity.

• Last month, Attorney General Schneiderman joined California and a number of environmental organizations by intervening in federal court to defend a national program to reduce greenhouse gas and improve fuel economy for passenger cars and light duty trucks. This follows on the heels of a successful defense of EPA’s first-ever greenhouse gas regulations. In a landmark decision handed down in June 2012 by a federal Appeals Court, Schneiderman argued on behalf of a coalition of states for the court to uphold these regulations.

Source

(via randomactsofchaos)

Reblogged from think-progress
Reblogged from olivialoserface
Reblogged from smeagoled
Reblogged from badasswomen

fuckyeahhardfemme:

tw: sexual and physical abuse

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

badasswomen:

Meet Aparna Bhola, India’s teen sex educator 

“There’s nothing to giggle or be shy about; there’s no shame in it. It’s important for us to learn about these things. Be totally bindaas (carefree) and ask me questions,” says Aparna Bhola, with a wide smile.

It’s a hot Sunday afternoon, but the stifling Mumbai summer air does nothing to curb the enthusiasm of the girls surrounding her. Aparna, a spunky 16-year-old, is in the midst of giving a group of her peers a candid sex-education class, and today’s topic is pregnancy. She leads the class confidently, dispelling superstitions with funny stories and apologizing disarmingly for her chalk drawing skills.

Aparna is member of a nongovernmental organization called Kranti, meaning “revolution,” which strives to give young women rescued from prostitution access to education and new opportunities. She was teaching the class as part of a partnership with an organization called Project Crayons, which runs a shelter for girls in Mumbai’s Malad neighborhood.

The daughter of a sex worker, Aparna grew up in Kolkata. Her mother, Malti, was married when she was 9 and was beaten by her husband. When she ran away and returned to her hometown in the Sundarbans, her aunt took her to Kolkata under the pretense of sending her to school. There, Malti was sold into sex work for 10,000 rupees ($180 at current exchange rates) when she was 12 years old. When she initially refused to be a prostitute, the brothel owner stuffed chili powder in her genitals to force her into submission, says Aparna.

Growing up in red-light districts, Aparna says she was distressed by the way doctors routinely mistreated sex workers because of the stigma against their profession. Her mother, diagnosed with uterine cysts, was unable to get treatment for them because of the bias against sex workers. Aparna remembers a niece being refused treatment by a doctor who said he didn’t want to bother with such poor people.

When sex workers like Aparna’s mother would become pregnant, the “doctors would treat them so badly,” Aparna recalls. “They would yell at them, and even slap them sometimes. They would say things like ‘You go and pick up anyone’s child and come to me with your stomach swollen. When you were doing it, you enjoyed yourself and now what happened?’ ”

These encounters made Aparna want to become a gynecologist. Even when she was younger, she would share with her friends and peers whatever sexual health-related information she could find.

“I want to work with gynecology to cater to sex workers because I know the issues they faced,” says Aparna, her face set in a determined expression. “If I became a doctor, I could give whatever information the mothers need when they are pregnant. There would be someone to talk to them nicely when they are in pain.”

In the time that she has spent at Kranti, Aparna has stopped drinking, improved her English, gained confidence and branched out into a number of extracurricular activities. She just completed grade 11, and is working toward her dream of becoming a gynecologist. This year she will enter the 12th grade and is planning to take the entrance examinations for medical school.

She also represented Maharashtra state in the Youth Parliament, an advisory group to the state government, where participants recently discussed whether sex education should be introduced in Indian schools.

“I used to think that my whole world is within the four walls of my room, of the house,” says Aparna. “Now I see that there is a big, big world beyond that where many things are possible for me.”

“What I really want is that girls become powerful and aren’t scared of anyone,” says Aparna. “They should think in their minds that ‘I will go ahead and progress and no one can hold me back.” 

Now THAT’S a fierce woman.

(via randomactsofchaos)

Reblogged from i-am-the-oracular-spectacular
Reblogged from andersonhummelarchive
Reblogged from runawayballoons-deactivated2012
runawayballoons:

No hate no matter if your slgbt. People are people

runawayballoons:

No hate no matter if your slgbt. People are people

(via dailyreasontobehappy)

Reblogged from loislanes

Josh Hutcherson @ GLAAD Media Awards

(via )

Reblogged from fleeting-absence